Skin Cancer/Sunscreen – The Dilemma – CME Online

Skin Cancer/Sunscreen – The Dilemma with Dr. Edward Gorham, PhD

Despite increases in sunscreen use and sun avoidance, melanoma is the most rapidly increasing skin malignancy. Could there be other factors that contribute to the risk of melanoma, and what role does the sun play? 

In this talk, Edward Gorham, PhD, discusses the dilemma of skin cancer and sunscreen use, and talks in depth about the difference between UVA and UVB exposure, the body’s physiological response to each type of irradiance, and how sun exposure and sunscreens affect the risk of skin cancers and vitamin D production.

 
Activity Description
Despite increases in sunscreen use and sun avoidance, melanoma is the most rapidly increasing skin malignancy.  Could there be other factors that contribute to the risk of melanoma, and what role does the sun play?  In this talk, Edward Gorham, PhD, discusses the dilemma of skin cancer and sunscreen use, and talks in depth about the difference between UVA and UVB exposure, the body’s physiological response to each type of irradiance, and how sun exposure and sunscreens affect the risk of skin cancers and vitamin D production.
 

Objectives
Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the epidemiology of cutaneous malignant melanoma in terms of:  person, place, and time
  2. Identify risk factors for melanoma (individual and behavioral characteristics, environmental risk factors)
  3. Differentiate between two kinds of ultraviolet irradiance:  UVA and UVB
  4. Recognize the difference between primary and secondary prevention of melanoma
  5. Make recommendations for primary prevention of melanoma based on its epidemiology

Target Audience
This educational program is designed for physicians, scientists/researchers, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, psychologists, and therapists of all specialties.

Method of Participation
The estimated time to complete this activity is 1-hour. To obtain credit, participants should take a brief pre-activity survey, view the activity video, answer the multiple-choice post test questions, and complete the evaluation form online to receive a certificate immediately upon completion. 

Accreditation
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas of policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and GrassrootsHealth. The University of California, San Diego School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation

AMA:
 The University of California, San Diego School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AAPA: AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. Physician assistants may receive a maximum of 1.0 hour of Category 1 credit for completing this program.

NURSES: For the purpose of recertification, the American Nurses Credentialing Center accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ issued by organizations accredited by the ACCME. For the purpose of relicensure, the California Board of Registered Nursing accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ (report up to 1.0 hour of credit and list “CME Category 1” as the provider number).

Release Date: May 18, 2016
Expiration Date: May 17, 2019

Balance and Objectivity of Content
It is the policy of the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to ensure balance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor. All persons involved in the selection, development and presentation of content are required to disclose any real or apparent conflicts of interest. All conflicts of interest will be resolved prior to an educational activity being delivered to learners through one of the following mechanisms 1) altering the financial relationship with the commercial interest, 2) altering the individual’s control over CME content about the products or services of the commercial interest, and/or 3) validating the activity content through independent peer review. All persons are also required to disclose any discussions of off label/unapproved uses of drugs or devices. Persons who refuse or fail to disclose are disqualified from participating in the CME activity. Participants will be asked to evaluate whether the speaker’s outside interests reflect a possible bias in the planning or presentation of the activity. This information is used to plan future activities.

Cultural Competency
This activity is in compliance with California Assembly Bill 1195 which requires CME courses with patient care components to include curriculum in the subjects of cultural and linguistic competencies. Cultural competency is defined as a set of integrated attitudes, knowledge, and skills that enables health care professionals or organizations to care effectively for patients from diverse cultures, groups, and communities. Linguistic competency is defined as the ability of a physician or surgeon to provide patients who do not speak English or who have limited ability to speak English, direct communication in the patient’s primary language. Cultural and Linguistic Competency was incorporated into the planning of this activity. Additional resources on cultural and linguistic competency and information about AB1195 can be found on the UC San Diego CME website at http://cme.ucsd.edu.

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